Aims

These were the main reasons why I undertook the challenge:

ONE: to highlight our over-consumption of plastic and the huge amount of waste we subsequently produce. 

TWO: to present the connection between our plastic habits and the environment; that it has an impact that is not necessarily immediate to us.


THREE: to explore how difficult it is to avoid using plastic; there is a distinct lack of choice for the discerning consumer.


FOUR: to raise money for the Karioi - Maunga ki te Moana Project, which is aimed at protecting Raglan's small colony of Oi or Grey Faced Petrel (among other endangered species). Oi, as sea feeders, are vulnerable to our plastic litter.


My biggest hope is that through this exercise I can, at the very least, get people to reflect on their plastic use and hopefully change their behaviour as consumers.

6 comments:

  1. Hi Merren,

    Matthew from RubbishFree sent me the link to your website. I'm very proud of you! If you feel like you are the only one who cares remember that you are part of a growing number of people all over the world who are cutting out plastic.

    Good luck!
    Helen

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    Replies
    1. Thanks very much Helen, it's motivating to know others are working towards the same goal. Great blog by the way; I've added a link to it on the shopping guide (right at the top!).
      Merren

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  2. Hi Merren. Can't believe I have only just come across your blog! I guess things come to us when we're ready...I know you've been going for a while but I am just beginning this journey. We're a busy family of four and although I have always been a 'cook from scratch as much as possible' person there are times we opt for convenience. We are able to recycle quite a lot where I live in the UK and our non recyclable waste - although much reduced - is brimming with cellophane and plastics that cannot be recycled. I feel awful about it but am determined to reduce this even more. It's going to take some adjusting (and educating of hubby �)but I'm determined to take a day at a time and start some longer changes for us. Thanks so much. This blog is really inspiring and your honesty is refreshing! Love and light, Kim x

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    Replies
    1. Hi Kim, thanks so much for your lovely supportive comments. I absolutely admire you attempting to reduce your plastic consumption when you have a family. That is no mean feat, and one of the reasons I was able to complete my plastic free year was because I was buying for one person. Any step towards reduction, no matter how small, is a win for the environment, so I wish you and your family all the best with it.
      Take care,
      Merren

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  3. Hello Merren, I applaud your goals. I agree with many things your website talks about, and have been practicing many of them already. It is great to see somebody take the time and present such detailed information. I understand that your aims, as stated above, are mainly to do with general overuse of plastics, detriment to the environment, and general impact to human health. As a person who suffers from sensitivity to plastics, I want to add my comments, and say that in some cases, when your comments say plastic-free, in an absolute sense, it actually is not plastic-free.

    One example would be reusing of store bought food jars and tin metal containers. Even though these are made out off metal, and in the case of metal containers, look like bare polished metal on the inside, they are in fact coated with a very fine layer of some sort of a epoxy/plastic substance. Same applies to metal jar lids, they all have some sort of coating on the inside, sometimes more obvious because the coating has a color.

    Other example of not actually plastic free, for a person like me, would be the plastic free recipes. For example wheat or salt may come in what seems like paper based bag or box, but in actual fact the paper on the inside has a very fine coating. And while this may seem trivial to some people, it is very real for me, when I eat some food which has been made with some ingredient that absorbed off gassing from it's container.

    One glaring omission from your website besides food, household items, etc., is furniture, and other things. Again, coming from personal health point of view, of particular concern is polyurethane foam. I think majority of people do not even realize how bad for ones health this stuff is. All I can say is, good luck if you are trying to get a sofa, chairs, carpet underlay... , that is not made with polyurethane foam, polyester, possibly toxic glues used in manufacturing (which as I understand are not as regulated as other components, and as well do not have to be specified on the product's materials statement tag), etc.

    It is an unfortunate state of affairs in the world regarding plastics and chemicals, there being much secrecy and not having to disclose what is used to make plastics, and as well the onus being on one to prove something is harmful, as opposed to having to prove it is not. Fine example would be the current BPA free rating. Who is to say that the mysterious and untested ingredient/s used in its place are safe.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Hello Merren, I applaud your goals. I agree with many things your website talks about, and have been practicing many of them already. It is great to see somebody take the time and present such detailed information. I understand that your aims, as stated above, are mainly to do with general overuse of plastics, detriment to the environment, and general impact to human health. As a person who suffers from sensitivity to plastics, I want to add my comments, and say that in some cases, when your comments say plastic-free, in an absolute sense, it actually is not plastic-free.

    One example would be reusing of store bought food jars and tin metal containers. Even though these are made out off metal, and in the case of metal containers, look like bare polished metal on the inside, they are in fact coated with a very fine layer of some sort of a epoxy/plastic substance. Same applies to metal jar lids, they all have some sort of coating on the inside, sometimes more obvious because the coating has a color.

    Other example of not actually plastic free, for a person like me, would be the plastic free recipes. For example wheat or salt may come in what seems like paper based bag or box, but in actual fact the paper on the inside has a very fine coating. And while this may seem trivial to some people, it is very real for me, when I eat some food which has been made with some ingredient that absorbed off gassing from it's container.

    One glaring omission from your website besides food, household items, etc., is furniture, and other things. Again, coming from personal health point of view, of particular concern is polyurethane foam. I think majority of people do not even realize how bad for ones health this stuff is. All I can say is, good luck if you are trying to get a sofa, chairs, carpet underlay... , that is not made with polyurethane foam, polyester, possibly toxic glues used in manufacturing (which as I understand are not as regulated as other components, and as well do not have to be specified on the product's materials statement tag), etc.

    It is an unfortunate state of affairs in the world regarding plastics and chemicals, there being much secrecy and not having to disclose what is used to make plastics, and as well the onus being on one to prove something is harmful, as opposed to having to prove it is not. Fine example would be the current BPA free rating. Who is to say that the mysterious and untested ingredient/s used in its place are safe.

    ReplyDelete